That's My Congress

Members' Strength of Affiliation to the LGBT Caucus in the U.S. Congress, 2009-2010

There are 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus, an official Congressional Member Organization dedicated within the 111th Congress to "serving as a resource for Members of Congress, their staff, and the public on LGBT issues" and on a legislative front to working "toward the extension of equal rights, the repeal of discriminatory laws, the elimination of hate-motivated violence, and the improved health and well being for all regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression."

All 82 members of the LGBT Equality caucus have taken a symbolic stand in allegiance to this platform by joining the caucus, but symbolic statements alone do nothing to further the cause of equal rights for gay, lesbian and transgendered people in America. Marriage rights and freedom from discrimination will happen when LGBT Americans are given the equal protection under law that the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution promises. Members of the caucus should be judged not simply according to their membership, but according to their record of legislative action to support the 19 bills that make up the LGBT Equality Slate for 2009-2010.

That's what this web page aims to do. Below and to the left, you'll see our rankings of the 82 House members of the LGBT Equality Caucus according to the percentage of the caucus' own slate of civil rights bills that members have actively supported through the act of cosponsorship. For each member, we indicate not only that percentage, but also provide links to information on the bills that she or he has not yet cosponsored. Find your Representative, click on those bill links, inform yourself regarding those bills. After you do, click on the Representative's name to find his or her contact information, then get in touch to make your gentle yet persistent advocacy known.

On the right hand side below, you'll see rankings of the bills according to what percent of LGBT Equality Caucus members have lined up to support them. This is a pretty good indication of the importance of the bills to the caucus. Brief descriptions of each bill are also found below; if you see a bill that strikes you as especially important, but that does not receive a high level of support from the LGBT Equality Caucus, consider what you can do to increase the bill's visibility. A mention on Facebook, a blurb on Twitter, a longer-form essay on your blog or a full letter to the editor of your local paper may be in order.


Which LGBT Equality Caucus Members Most Strongly Support the Equality Platform?

Strong Members of the LGBT Equality Caucus


These caucus members are strong supporters of equality for gay, lesbian and transgender Americans, supporting at least three-quarters of the slate of LGBT equality legislation.

Moderate Members of the LGBT Equality Caucus


These caucus members are strong supporters of equality for gay, lesbian and transgender Americans, supporting at least half but less than three-quarters of the slate of LGBT equality legislation before the 111th Congress.

Weak Members of the LGBT Equality Caucus


These caucus members are strong supporters of equality for gay, lesbian and transgender Americans, supporting less than half the slate of LGBT equality legislation before the 111th Congress.

Which LGBT Equality Caucus Members Most Strongly Support the Equality Platform?

The following is the slate of bills before the United States Congress that the LGBT Equality Caucus has itself* identified as supportive of equal civil rights for gay, lesbian and transgender Americans:

H.R. 1024

H.R. 1024, the Uniting American Families Act, is a bill which aims to put into closer compliance with the U.S. Constitution by removing discrimination according to the status of permanent couples. Under current immigration law, married immigrant spouses of citizens and permanent residents have a preferred route toward gaining permanent resident status themselves. Unmarried partners of citizens and permanent residents have this avenue closed to them. That is unequal treatment under law for immigrants under American jurisdiction, and it is an unequal abridgment of legal privilege for the citizens whose permanent partners wish to join them. The Uniting American Families Act would end immigration discrimination against same-sex couples when one member of a couple is a citizen or permanent resident and the other is seeking citizenship or residency status.

73 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 1283

H.R. 1283, the Military Readiness Enhancement Act, would if passed prohibit discrimination against any members of the U.S. military (including the Coast Guard) on the basis of sexual orientation. This bill would bring the era of Don't-Ask-Don't-Tell policy to an end.

82 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 1551

H.R. 1551 would create grants to states to develop youth educational programs regarding HIV and (optionally) sexual orientation as part of a broader sexual education curriculum.

51 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 1616

H.R. 1616 would allow states to provide Medicaid coverage to low-income people infected with HIV.

63 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 1913

H.R. 1913 is a bill that would grant the Attorney General the ability to devote federal resources to assist in the investigation or prosecution of a "hate crime" motivated by prejudice, including prejudice based on the victim's actual or perceived sexual orientation.

60 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 2262

If passed, H.R. 2262 would issue grants for anti-bullying educational and research programs to find out more about and counter student-to-student bullying in school, including that on the basis of sexual orientation.

52 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 2517

H.R. 2517 would leap beyond President Barack Obama's quarter-measure of 2009 to grant same-sex domestic partners of federal workers the same benefits as federal workers' different-sex spouses.

75 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 2625

H.R. 2625 extends the tax benefit to federal filers of deducting the cost of health coverage for spouses from gross income so that the reduction also applies to the cost of health coverage provided for same-sex domestic partners.

23 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 2709

H.R. 2709 embeds the Uniting American Families Act (see above) within a broader bill to rationalize and provide equity in family immigration rules not only for same-sex couples, but for other non-traditional and exceptional family circumstances as well.

53 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 2744

H.R. 2744 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disability status by any health care or research program receiving Federal funding.

4 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 3001

H.R. 3001, the Ending Health Disparities Act, is a bill to outlaw discrimination in public health care provision, to create federal tax equity for same-sex couples receiving health plan benefits, and to ensure that same-sex domestic partners of federal employees receive access to a variety of employee benefits to the same extent as married partners.

18 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 3017

H.R. 3017 is a bill to outlaw discrimination in hiring on the basis of sexual orientation.

81 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 3827

H.R. 3827 would prohibit organizations receiving federal funding from slowing or halting adoptions or foster child placements on the basis of the sexual orientation of an adoptive or foster parent.

12 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 4376

H.R. 4376 is a bill to outlaw discrimination in extension of credit to people on the basis of their sexual orientation.

38 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.R. 4530

H.R. 4530 is a bill dedicated to the goal of ending discrimination based on actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity in public schools, and to do so by prohibiting conduct that harasses students or excludes them from activities on the basis of these differences.

49 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.Con.Res. 92

H.Con.Res. 92 is a symbolic bill without force of law, declaring support for the National Day of Silence meant to bring attention to widespread bullying and harassment directed at gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender students in schools.

36 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.Res. 308

H.Res. 308 is another symbolic bill without force of law, one to declare honor for Pedro Pablo Zamora y Diaz, the activist who dedicated his last years to raising awareness about HIV and AIDS in communities of color and to dispelling misconceptions about gay people of color.

20 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.Res. 433

H.Res. 433 is a third symbolic bill without force of law for Congress to recognizes the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, honor those who participated, and "recommit itself to protecting and providing equal rights for all Americans, including those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender."

40 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

H.Res. 436

H.Res. 436 is a fourth symbolic bill without force of law for Congress to recognize the life and work of the late Bea Arthur, not only for her acting work but also for her advocacy work on behalf of homeless LGBT teens.

1 out of the 82 members of the LGBT Equality Caucus have cosponsored this bill.

* This page is meant to serve as a report of consistency between LGBT Equality Caucus membership and support for the bills listed on the LGBT Equality Caucus slate. Presentation of a bill here should not be interpreted as support for the bill by the staff of That's My Congress. Neither should presentation of a bill be interpreted as a call for you to support that bill. Use your brain, read each bill and make an informed decision for yourself before contacting your member of Congress.

Information current as of January 30, 2010
Return to That's My Congress